The Adventures of a Cub Reporter

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History

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 Lighthouses

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Lighthouse History

                    Sept 11, 1999 Cheryl Roberts and Joe Jakubic check out the new location of the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse. author's note: The Cape Hatteras Lighthouse has been moved. Cheryl Roberts, co-founder of the Outer Banks Lighthouse Society, helped to promote the move and Joe Jakubic was the engineering specialist that helped to move it and make our dreams come true. And just to add some folk lore to it all I set the lighthouse on it's final foundation (see above picture and story). Although I did not actually lift up the Cape Hatteras lighthouse, my family and I stayed on the Outer Banks for a week to watch it being moved to it's new position. The picture of me puting the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse in it's proper place shows me wearing the official commemorative hard hat with the logo of the Outer Banks Lighthouse Society on it. The members of our society were the first people allowed to inspect the lighthouse at it's new location. After I had done my "chores" I climbed the spiral stairway all the way to the top---at the observation area. After looking around I saw a ladder in the enclosed area that went further up. I climbed a short way up and found the new, modern illumination system. I then walked back down stairs, went outside, looked up and marveled that this 400,000 ton structure was moved successfully--ahead of schedule. And then, I wrote a letter to the editor of the Jacksonville Daily News and said this particular project was one of the Seven Wonders Of The Modern World .  The letter was published in just a few days. This was different from one of my previously written letters. It took sixty years for the newspaper to publish the story I wrote in 1940 ( See the story in The Adventures Of A Cub Reporter about the fire). Now that's progress.

1-23-2012: Cheryl Roberts was the Editor of the newsletter for the Outer Banks Lighthouse Society (OBLHS). The name of this newsletter is THE LIGHTHOUSE NEWS. She began publishing some of my stories soon after the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse was moved to a new and safer location in 1999(It was moved 1500 feet inland). The Cape Hatteras weighs 400,000 tons and the picture of me placing the lighthouse in its new foundation is obviously an exaggeration. It was done in Fun just  to commemorate the fact  that I had written many stories about the lighthouses on the Outer Banks of North Carolina and had helped put them on a firm  public relations foundation  And then   there was the story about Old Baldy, the Lighthouse at Bald Head Island just off the coast from Southport and close to Wilmington. Cheryl published the story: MY SEARCH FOR A JEWEL OF THE CAPE FEAR, in 2005. ( As the editor of the newsletter Cheryl pioneered the publication of a family adventure which could take place even on a vacation. This type of vacation would be more than just fun-----it would be a vacation with a purpose---the North Carolina way. This way developed into a series of stories which would be in various publications on  the conservation and information about our lighthouses and other things of Coastal North Carolina. (Things began to happen when  I told one of my friends, Madison Taylor, about my story concerning the jewel of the Cape Fear. Madison was the editor of the Daily News at that time and he was so impressed with this unique adventure that he published it as a special feature the newspaper. The story began when my family and I were on one of our trips to Wilmington to visit Nelia Smith, Billie Jean's mother. It was probably in 1970. One of the things we liked to do on these visits was to go to Labriolie's Antique Shop. A clerk suggested that since I was an optometrist and was interested in lenses,  that I should buy what she said was a bar prism which was a part of the illumination system (the Fresnel Lens) of the lighthouses. Although I was suspicious when the clerk told me that the prism was a part of the illumination system, I purchased it for fifty dollars and the rest is history.